Past Association Activities

2010

  • Voted at Annual Fall CWL LID Meeting to keep the LID assessment at $200.
  • By approved motion, clarified the terms of office for LID Executive Board.
  • Curly Leaf Pond Weed treatment
  • Copper sulfate for snails
  • Recommended no Coontail treatment ­ as it was not as prevalent as in the past.
  • Sago Pondweed (nuisance weed) severely limited lake navigation, was not treated.
  • Membership discuss pending proposal by DNR to significantly raise permit fees.
  • Membership was encouraged to continue to write legislators and attend public hearings.
  • Encouraging Lakeshore Restoration ­ grants available, toured the lake for examples of good and bad lakescaping.

2009

  • Voted at Annual Fall CWL LID Meeting to keep the LID assessment at $200.
  • Curly Leaf Pond Weed treatment
  • Coontail treatments (2 treatments)
  • Copper sulfate treatment for snails
  • MN DNR Aquatic Management Specialist attended annual meeting to answer questions.
  • Membership discuss pending proposal by DNR to significantly raise permit fees.
  • Membership were encouraged to write legislators and attend public hearings

2008

  • Voted at Annual Fall CWL LID Meeting to keep the LID assessment at $200.
  • Curly Leaf Pond Weed treatment
  • Coontail treatments (2 treatments)
  • Copper sulfate treatment for snails
  • Jackie Froemming, Home Extension Agent did a presentation on Lakeshore Restoration and Rain Gardens

2007

  • Crow Wing County Commissioners approved the Crow Wing Lake Improvement District.
  • Assessments were deposited in CWL LID Account: $27,400.
  • Increased revenue from LID assessments allowed for increased treatment of invasive weeds.

2006

  • Crow Wing Lake Improvement District approved by association, property owners and DNR.
    • At the 06/02/06 general CWLA meeting, background information on Lake Improvement Districts was presented. Membership voted to draft a LID proposal with a recommended $200 assessment. Officers were elected.
    • Summer 2006, 82 LID petition signatures were secured and submitted to Crow Wing County along with other pertinent documents.
    • 09/05/06: Presented LID application to County Commissioners

2005

  • CWLA voted to continue the voluntary weed control contribution to $200 per owner.
    92 donors raised $19,660 (64% of property owners)
  • Ron Duy, MN Shoreline Restoration of Nisswa was contracted again to treat Curly
  • LeafPondweed, Coontail, and Swimmers' Itch.
  • Continued educational programs on environmental lake stewardship.

2004

  • CWLA voted to continue the voluntary weed control contribution to $200 per owner.
    77 donors raised $16,120 (53% of property owners)
  • Ron Duy, MN Shoreline Restoration of Nisswa was contracted again to treat Curly
  • LeafPondweed, Coontail, and lake-wide spraying for snails to control Swimmers' Itch.
  • Continued educational programs on environmental lake stewardship.

2003

  • CWLA voted to continue the voluntary weed control contribution to $200 per owner.
    77 donors raised $16,450 (53% of property owners)
  • Ron Duy, MN Shoreline Restoration of Nisswa was contracted again to treat Curly
  • LeafPondweed, Coontail, and Swimmers' Itch.
  • Continued educational programs on environmental lake stewardship.

2002

  • CWLA voted to increase the voluntary weed control contribution to $200 per owner.
    99 donors raised $21,250 for treatment (69% of property owners)
  • Ron Duy, MN Shoreline Restoration of Nisswa was contracted to treat Curly Leaf Pondweed, Coontail, and Swimmers' Itch.
  • Continued educational programs on environmental lake stewardship.

2001

  • The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) agreed to conduct a Lake Assessment Study of CWL. The MPCA waived the $5000 fee.
  • MPCA noted that the watershed was the major source of contamination
  • CWL water quality was deemed poor (eutropic) compared to other lakes in the Northern Lakes Eco-­region.
  • Increasing levels of phosphorus and algae leading to lake degradation was attributed to natural watershed nutrients and to cultural/human contribution.
  • A team of CWLA residents began measuring water clarity using a Secchi Disc, as part of a Citizens Lake Monitoring Program sponsored by the MPCA. This team continued to monitor water clarity for several years.
  • In accordance with the 1995 CWLA resolution to have all septic systems surrounding CWL in conformance with the MN State Codes, CWC Planning and Zoning Office records were reviewed. All county records were not necessarily accurate and updated, so were not used as a benchmark.
  • CWLA worked with CWC Planning and Zoning and CWC County Attorney to establish enforcement procedures for upgrading non-conforming systems.
  • CWLA contracted with Bob Bartels to inspect all septic systems around CWL.
  • We believe we have 100% conforming septic systems at this point, well ahead of the 2007 goal.
  • Invasive weeds were completely clogging the lake, CWLA members wer asked to voluntarily contribute $100 per property owner to an invasive weed control fund.
  • 68 donors raised $8,820 for treatment (47% of property owners)

2000
  • Received a grant from the Initiative Foundation to assemble a Lake Management Plan. Water quality testing was done at both inlets, the main body, and at the outlet. 
  • It was determined that the two inlets were major sources of phosphorus contamination.
  • CWLA voted to contract with AquaTec of Little Falls to study water quality and clarity and to help determine sources of contamination.
  • Education programs began to encourage property owners to discontinue use of phospohorus rich fertilizers and discontinue other practices that may contribute to nutrient rich contamination of the lake.

1999
  • Voluntary septic system inspection program. Majority of adjoining property owners participated in this inspection, with those either complying with, or upgrading systems, to current regulations. 
  • CWLA participated in the Initiative Foundation's Healthy Lakes Program. Five CWLA members attended several training sessions designed to guide lake associations through the process of assessing and evaluating the lake ecosystem.
  • CWLA received a grant from the Initiative Foundation to conduct more information sessions and record good and poor lake stewardship practices to help general membership recognize the need for lake improvement.
  • Goals and priorities for lake improvement were set. A Good Lake Management Plan was designed for CWL.
  • The DNR completed an aquatic plant survey of CWL. The DNR identified two invasive exotic plants as prolific and nuisance: Curly Leaf Pondweed and Coontail.
1998
  • Street signs are purchased and installed around the lake. 
1997
  • Central Lakes College Environmental Science students, under the direction of their instructor, Robert Fedeler, conducted a limnological and land use study of the CWL watershed. 
  • The 7 mile, 10,218 acre watershed that drains into CWL is believed to be the major source of nutrient contamination.
  • CLC developed a map of the watershed for CWLA.
  • They found no major farm or industrial contamination in the watershed.

1996
  • Roads around the lake are paved.
1995
  • At the annual CWLA member meeting on 9/2/95, a resolution was adopted to have all non-conforming septic systems around CWL upgraded to Crow Wing County standards of conformance by the end of 2007.
  • CWC Lakes and Rivers Alliance was working to ensure that local retailers promoted sale of non-phosphorus lawn fertilizer.
  • CWLA used fall and spring meetings and the CWLA newsletter to inform property owners of the importance of reducing nutrients flowing into the lake.

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